The Skyscraper Museum
The Skyscraper Museum


Located in New York City, the world's first and foremost vertical metropolis, The Skyscraper Museum celebrates the City's rich architectural heritage and examines the historical forces and individuals that have shaped its successive skylines. Through exhibitions, programs and publications, the Museum explores tall buildings as objects of design, products of technology, sites of construction, investments in real estate, and places of work and residence. For a description of the gallery and for photos of the space, please visit our Photo Slideshows page.

The Skyscraper Museum is located in lower Manhattan's Battery Park City at 39 Battery Place. Museum hours are 12-6 PM, Wednesday-Sunday.

General admission is $5, $2.50 for students and seniors. Click here for directions to the Museum. All galleries and facilities are wheelchair accessible.

UPCOMING EXHIBITION

TEN & TALLER, 1874-1900
Opens Sept 28, 2016






A 3-D CBD: How the 1916 Zoning Law
Shaped Manhattan's Central Business Districts


skyscrapers, One57, 111 West 57th Street, 432 Park Avenue, 520 Park Avenue, Central Park Tower, 220 Central Park South, 53W53rd, 100 E 53rd Street, Sky House, 45 E 22nd Street, One Madison, 35 Hudson Yards, 56 Leonard, 30 Park Place, 111 Murray Street, 125 Greenwich Street, 50 West Street, 9 DeKalb, new york architecture, nyc skyscrapers, luxury residential, residential skyscraper, new york's super-slenders, slender skyscrapers

1939-40 NYC Department of Finance tax lot photographs of the Garment District, showing the distinctive setbacks created by the 1916 zoning law. From left to right: 345-351 W. 35th Street; 347-351 W. 36th Street; 247-255 W. 38th Street.



This essay, published online on July 25, 2016, to mark the precise centennial of the passage of the New York City Zoning Resolution on July 25th, 1916, is a revised and updated version of a 1991 conference paper and subsequent chapter of a 1993 book, Planning and Zoning New York City: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. Organized by the New York City Department of City Planning, the conference celebrated the 75th anniversary of the zoning law with a symposium on the history and future of planning in New York City. Read the final report here

Click here to read the essay



skyscrapers, One57, 111 West 57th Street, 432 Park Avenue, 520 Park Avenue, Central Park Tower, 220 Central Park South, 53W53rd, 100 E 53rd Street, Sky House, 45 E 22nd Street, One Madison, 35 Hudson Yards, 56 Leonard, 30 Park Place, 111 Murray Street, 125 Greenwich Street, 50 West Street, 9 DeKalb, new york architecture, nyc skyscrapers, luxury residential, residential skyscraper, new york's super-slenders, slender skyscrapers

​The Skyscraper Museum has created a new web project that explains an emerging form in skyscraper history that has evolved in New York over the past decade:  the super-slender, ultra luxury residential tower. These pencil-thin periscopes — all 50 to 90+ stories — use a development and design strategy of slenderness to pile their city-regulated maximum square feet of floor area (FAR) as high in the sky to as possible to create luxury apartments defined by spectacular views.

Click here to view NEW YORK'S SUPER-SLENDERS



UPCOMING PROGRAMS

Wednesday, October 5, 2016 6:30-8 pm

Alexander Garvin Book Talk

What Makes a Great City

Island Press, 2016

What makes a great city? Not a good city, or a functional city, but a great city that people admire, learn from, and replicate. Planner and architect Alexander Garvin sets out to answer this question by closely observing successful cities such as Paris, London, New York, and Vienna. He argues that a great city is a dynamic, constantly changing place that residents and their leaders can reshape to satisfy their demands. Most importantly, it is the interplay between people and public realm that creates great cities.

Garvin analyzes how particular components of the public realm (squares in London, parks in Minneapolis, and streets in Madrid) have shaped people’s daily lives, and he shows how 21st- century initiatives in Paris, Houston, Atlanta, Brooklyn, and Toronto are making an already fine public realm even better.

​Alexander Garvin is a noted architect and urban planner. He is an adjunct professor of urban planning and management at Yale University. He heads a planning and design firm and lives in New York. Some of his previous books include The Planning Game: Lessons for Great Cities, Public Parks: The Key to Livable Communitie, and The American City: What Works, What Doesn’t.

All book talks are free and open to the public. The gallery opens at 6:00pm.

All guests must RSVP to programs@skyscraper.org to assure admittance.




Click here for more upcoming programs.




UPCOMING FAMILY PROGRAMS

BUILD YOUR OWN TEN AND TALLER SKYSCRAPER
October 1, 2016
10:30 – 11:45 AM
Children will go back in time to 1874 when the very first 10-story skyscraper was constructed. After comparing skyscrapers of today with the buildings of the museum’s new exhibition, TEN AND TALLER, time traveling visitors will choose their favorite skyscraper and attempt to reconstruct it with different building materials. Once completed the buildings will then be placed on a drawn New York City grid learning about the skyscrapers of old New York. Ages 5+. RSVP required.

Click here for more upcoming Family Programs



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The Museum is a participating member of the Downtown Culture Pass.

   The Skyscraper Museum supports the NYC Landmarks50 Alliance